Beware of black ice on the roads

June 22, 2015

Severe frosts will affect the South Island and sheltered inland parts of the North Island on Tuesday and Wednesday mornings. This will make driving conditions hazardous in some areas, especially roads that are already wet from recent rain or snow. “If the moisture on these roads freezes it forms ‘black ice’, which can be extremely dangerous,” warned MetService Meteorologist Stephen Glassey.

The major storm which brought heavy rain to many parts of the country on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, has moved away to the east of New Zealand, leaving behind a very cold southerly flow.

The southerlies will die away over the South Island on Monday evening as a ridge of high pressure makes its presence felt. The clearing skies and light winds will make perfect conditions for the temperatures to plummet overnight. Snow on the ground in some inland areas will also help cooling. Temperatures could drop to minus 10 degrees in some inland areas of the South Island.

Sheltered inland parts of the North Island will also see some frosts, but stronger southerly winds will prevent the overnight temperatures from getting as low as the South Island. However, the polar air means that daytime temperatures will struggle to get to double figures in many areas. “We are forecasting maximums of around 10 to 11 degrees for Auckland and Northland on Tuesday. That’s very cold for them, but they are still likely to be the warmest place in the country,” said Glassey.

Although it will be cold, most of New Zealand will have clear, dry weather on Tuesday. However, the southerly flow will push showers onto eastern and southern parts of the North Island. Similar conditions will affect the country on Wednesday and Thursday, before a front sweeps north on Friday.

Keep up to date with the latest forecasts and any watches/warnings at metservice.com or on mobile devices at m.metservice.com. You can also follow our updates on MetService TV, at MetService New Zealand on Facebook@metservice on Twitter and at blog.metservice.com.

For further information please contact:
Stephen Glassey Meteorologist (04)4700754

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